Ventilators are the last lifeline for Covid-19 patients. Their huge demand worldwide is a clear evidence of their importance in medical and health care facilities dealing with Novel Coronavirus. This demand created an impression of ventilators being an easier and confirmed treatment. Under this perception, they drop their guards and safety precautions such as washing their hands properly, using a face mask outdoors and practice physical distancing in public places.

But How effective ventilators really are for Covid-19 patients? What does it mean to be on a ventilator? How easy it is for a person and what side-effects a patient would face. An Emergency Medical Service provider, MedEvac Global expressed:

“I used to think a ventilator was an oxygen mask. The truth is so very much worse. I think most of the anti-isolation folks don’t realize what they want to expose themselves and their loved ones to potentially experiencing. I really wouldn’t wish this on an enemy much less want to bring the possibility of this home…”

For general awareness and safety, the company copied words of a front-line professional who works with ventilators, and we are doing the same.

Here you go folks… for those people who don’t understand what it means to be on a ventilator but want to take the chance of going back to work….

For starters, it’s NOT an oxygen mask put over the mouth while the patient is comfortably lying down and reading magazines. Ventilation for Covid-19 is a painful intubation that goes down your throat and stays there until you live or you die.

It is done under anesthesia for 2 to 3 weeks without moving, often upside down, with a tube inserted from the mouth up to the trachea and allows you to breathe to the rhythm of the lung machine. The patient can’t talk or eat, or do anything naturally – the machine keeps you alive.

The discomfort and pain they feel from this means medical experts have to administer sedatives and painkillers to ensure tube tolerance for as long as the machine is needed. It’s like being in an artificial coma.

After 20 days from this treatment, a young patient loses 40% muscle mass, and gets mouth or vocal cords trauma, as well as possible pulmonary or heart complications. It is for this reason that old or already weak people can’t withstand the treatment and die.

Many of us are in this boat … so stay safe unless you want to take the chance of ending up here.

This is NOT the flu.

Add a tube into your stomach, either through your nose or skin for liquid food, a sticky bag around your butt to collect the diarrhea, a foley to collect urine, an IV for fluids and meds, an A-line f to monitor your BP that is completely dependent upon finely calculated med doses, teams of nurses, CRNA’s and MA’s to reposition your limbs every two hours and lying on a mat that circulates ice cold fluid to help bring down your 104 degree temp.

Does anyone want to try all that out?

Many of us are in this boat … so stay safe unless you want to take the chance of ending up here.

This is NOT the flu.

Add a tube into your stomach, either through your nose or skin for liquid food, a sticky bag around your butt to collect the diarrhea, a foley to collect urine, an IV for fluids and meds, an A-line f to monitor your BP that is completely dependent upon finely calculated med doses, teams of nurses, CRNA’s and MA’s to reposition your limbs every two hours and lying on a mat that circulates ice cold fluid to help bring down your 104 degree temp.

Does anyone want to try all that out?

In the comments of the discussed post, we learned more from users

“You are not always asleep. I was woken up but still on ventilation. They need to clean tubes regularly. Your oxygen supply is stopped while this happens it’s horrible and left me with pts.” Diane Kempton shared her experience being on a ventilator and many agreed with her.

Stay home. Stay safe and well!
Source: Facebook Page of Medevac Global

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